Insights into Entertainment

Insights Into Entertainment: Episode 24 "Fight Clubs and Space Flight"

July 29, 2019 Joseph and Michelle Whalen Season 1 Episode 24
Insights into Entertainment
Insights Into Entertainment: Episode 24 "Fight Clubs and Space Flight"
Chapters
00:00:00
Introductions
00:07:05
Disney Detective
00:15:55
Entertainment News
00:30:29
Michelle's Insightful Pick of the Week
00:37:10
Joe's Insightful Pick of the Week
Insights into Entertainment
Insights Into Entertainment: Episode 24 "Fight Clubs and Space Flight"
Jul 29, 2019 Season 1 Episode 24
Joseph and Michelle Whalen

Disney is turning into a regular fight club with yet another fist fight at a Disney Park. We'll follow up on the score card from the last fight in Disneyland. Then we'll talk about how Disney is desperately clawing its way to the top movies spot with it's desperate attempts to unseat Avatar as the highest grossing movie ever with Avengers End Game. We'll look at some Doctor Who news, then a few articles about one of our favorite shows The Orville before we finish up with our Insightful Picks of the Week.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Disney is turning into a regular fight club with yet another fist fight at a Disney Park. We'll follow up on the score card from the last fight in Disneyland. Then we'll talk about how Disney is desperately clawing its way to the top movies spot with it's desperate attempts to unseat Avatar as the highest grossing movie ever with Avengers End Game. We'll look at some Doctor Who news, then a few articles about one of our favorite shows The Orville before we finish up with our Insightful Picks of the Week.

Speaker 1:

Insightful pocket by informative pope's insights into things . A podcast network.

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] welcome

Speaker 3:

to insights into entertainment, a podcast series, taking a deeper look into entertainment and media. Your hosts, Joseph and Michelle Whalen , a husband and wife, team of pop culture, phonetics are exploring all things from music and movies to television and fandom.

Speaker 2:

[inaudible]

Speaker 4:

welcome to insights and entertainment. This is episode 24 fight club and space flight. I'm your host, Joseph Whalen and my radiant and wonderful cohost, Michelle Whalen . Hello, my love. Hello dear. So we had a very busy show today and we did, we've kind of cut that off a little bit here. Uh, and we will be doing I our first event special after this one dedicated to

Speaker 5:

San Diego comic . Yeah ,

Speaker 4:

we had way too much information can come out of comic con to fit into this podcast. So we're going to do a separate one just for that. Yes, we are wanting to make sure we did it justice. Absolutely. Before we start though, we did have a rather busy week. Uh , we recorded our podcast early last week. We sure did. Uh , what did we do last week after the product ?

Speaker 5:

Oh , last week we had a little weekend getaway down in Maryland. We did a, s spent a little bit of time in ocean city, Maryland , uh , which is , uh , a very popular vacation destination for the East Coast, which we've actually never done. Yeah. And our first time it was our first time a w and uh , to cap off our trip home. We took the , uh, Cape may ferry from Delaware, so little added a bonus on top of that. And uh, then last night we had a, another uh, fun evening at the man in , uh , Philadelphia. Um, and we got to see star wars, empire strikes back in concert with the Philadelphia , uh , orchestra. Yep , sure did. That was awesome. Very awesome. And uh, what was very cool was the fact that, well, you were just to say you were the one that actually bought the tickets for that show. So you would pick the seats. I didn't even pay attention , uh, when, when you bought them. Uh , and it wasn't until we got there and you know, they were like, oh, you're in the pit. We're like the pit what? We were literally the fourth row from, from the stage. Uh , and that was, that was pretty cool. Um, last year we went and we went to see a new Ho hoping concert and we were two or three rows back from the pit. Right, right. We were about four rows better, but in the pit itself. Right. Um, you're literally right next to the orchestra. Oh yeah. And what I thought was funny was there were so many different parts of the movie where you couldn't hear the dialogue because you were literally on top of the orchestra and they were just so out overpowering. It wasn't a bad thing. Cause the music is beautiful . Right . We are , we're not going for the movie cause right. Chances are we seen it. You've probably already seen it. Or if you're spending that much money to see the movie it just go and buy it or rent it somewhere going for the music. Yeah. It was a fantastic, it was, the weather was beautiful, thankfully. Um, for anybody that's, you know, been on the, the east coast or in this area, you know, we've had the heat waves, you know, for the last two weeks. Um, and one of the other patrons , um, as we were walking out mentioned , uh , that she had a friend of hers that had been there earlier in the week and saw Harry Potter with the orchestra, but it happened to be when it was 95 degrees out at night. And she actually, her friend said that she actually had to leave more than halfway through the movie because it was just too hot. So yeah. So I couldn't imagine because it is a mostly outdoor , uh, venue. So , um, speaking of that, the little , uh , insider tip that we learned sitting in the pit, the air conditioned the stage for the performers and when you sit in the pit, because the pit is section off with a , a wall, a low wall, the air conditioning spills over the stage, the performers, the pits . That was Kinda Nice . So being outside, we did kind of have our own air conditioning so that if you do go and it's hot, you want to have tickets in the pit. Yeah, exactly. So that was very cool. Anyway, we're not featuring that on the podcast today. Well, and for anybody that is in the Philadelphia area and a star wars fan for next summer, they obviously are continuing with the saga and they will be doing return to the jet . I yes, they will. So anyway, onto the podcast. Sure. So today in our Disney detective we have interation . This is where our fight club portion of the total comes from. We had a physical altercation at

Speaker 4:

tower of terror and Disney Disneyworld . We have a follow up on the violent fight that occurred in Disney land a few weeks ago. Uh , and then we have some Avengers and game news. Then in our entertainment news. Uh , we'll talk a little bit about canine from doctor who, and then we have a , uh, update on the Orville. Uh, and a story we had previously featured , uh , regarding the wedding of a couple of the stair , uh, of cast of the Orville . Then we will move on to our insightful picks of the week , um, which , uh , one of which stays with our theme of space flight. Uh, and , uh, we'll go from there. I don't think we have any afterthoughts this week doing

Speaker 5:

no cause our afterthoughts will be higher separate podcast , all different podcasts today.

Speaker 4:

All right , so let's come back and get into Disney, the tech.

Speaker 5:

Alrighty .

Speaker 6:

Uh,

Speaker 5:

go for Disney detective. So, you know, obviously the, our next story is the followup to the fight that had happened in Disney land. So not to be out done now. We had an altercation in a Disney world. Uh , it was actually in , um, Hollywood studios , um , by the tower of terror ride. So the attack began on the evening of the 13th when a Chicago woman and her group were up .

Speaker 4:

I didn't want to stop you there for a second. The way you start that off, it sounds like a, of , uh , like newer detective ,

Speaker 5:

good novel. The attack occurred on the evening of July 13th . It was a dark and stormy night. Well, and , and what's kind of funny is the tower of terrorists that, you know, new art type type thing. So it was so fitting that I'm so glad you could comment on that. Um, so basically her, her and her group were upset that their FastPasses weren't valid for the ride. So the incident happened in the pre show area where visitors are ushered through a creepy library and they basically watch , um, stuff about the twilight zone. Um, and so a 20 , the 23 year old Disney cast member was offering to help them with the FastPasses the, but the group just became more and more angry. So she was standing at a podium and she was calling her supervisor to try and, you know, request security. Well, that's when the Chicago woman began pushing buttons on the ride podium. And then the cast member tried to stop her and kind of, you know, push her hand away and that's when the guest punched her in the face.

Speaker 4:

And why do I sense that this woman who started all this is now going to sue Disney for this other woman assaulting her by pushing

Speaker 5:

her [inaudible] . So the scene then escalated where the family continued to yell profanities and they were recording it on their phones. So the woman and her group left the tower of terror , um, as the, the cast member was talking with security, but security ended up finding them, you know, a few minutes later , um, uh , when the sheriff's office responded, the cast members I was swollen, was , uh , uh, had a little bit of swelling going on, but she declined treatment. Um, and she didn't want to press charges, which I don't know why you wouldn't. But now Disney has also issued a lifetime ban for the Chicago woman. Wow. That's pretty bad. If Disney actually bans you for life, that's, that's hardcore. So could I get banned for life from business? Maybe. If you want, you don't have to go. I don't make you go. No, I don't make you frequently know early, early, and often. I'll book a trip without you. That's fine. And then when I don't take you because you dropped in like a bad habit and you'll be all upset. Oh, you went to dude and you doubt me. I can't believe you went without me. Places to vacation besides, and we could do that too. Okay. So , so that was our, our Disney world story. So we have updates on yet another fight club scene and is , so obviously we had talked about this, you know , uh, not that long ago about the family that the fight broke out in Disney land in Toontown and probably the most kid friendly area of the park. Um, so three adults who were , um, allegedly involved with the violent brawl , uh, that took place earlier this month and now have been , uh , or will be charged. So there was the brother who he's been charged with five felonies and nine misdemeanors. Then he allegedly attacked his sister, his brother in law and girlfriend at the park, and then endangering his child. And three other children who they were all at Disneyland with almost sounds like I do sitcoms . My God, it does. So then he also allegedly threatened to kill members of his family after he was escorted out of the park. Oh, just a capital . Right . And then in addition, he said, I'm ready to go to jail tonight before allegedly assaulting a Disneyland cast member and , um , with his car following the fight according to the press release. So He is facing one felony count of domestic battery and one felony account of assault. And you know, he's , he's just a hot mess, so that's him. So then sister has been charged with five misdemeanors, including for misdemeanor charges of battery for attacking her brother and his girlfriend and one for just attacking the brother's girlfriend. Um, then the sister, her husband wasn't the , the third involved. He's facing one misdemeanor count of battery , um, because he's accused of punching the brother's girlfriend during the brawl. So it was basically like a bar fight. Everybody started punching, so , okay . So during this whole thing , um , there was an older woman who was in a scooter. She got knocked down. She didn't get charged with anything. Nope . She didn't get charged with anything about the baby that was in the stroller that I know charged cause everyone else walked down . So if everybody is convicted of their crimes, the brother faces a maximum of seven to 14 months in state prison while the sister faces up to two and a half years. Uh, I'm sorry, seven, seven years and 14 months. I'm sorry I read that wrong. Um, I was gonna say, cause he was going to get less time. Uh, the sister would pays two and a half years and then the husband just six months, so. Wow. Yeah. I'm guessing they're probably banned for life as well. Is your lesson learned? Don't get in a little fight in Toontown right. Cause it, it'll cost ya and then don't talk about it cause we don't talk about, because we don't talk about fight clubs . So that's it with all our , our beating up people and, and fight clubs and stuff . We need to get some European people involved here and some of the European and the Asian parks now. Right, right. Just have all the violence in . No, let's, let's not have it go any place else. Let, let's have some of the other parks be happy. That's your place. Harris. We have the employee cause we have the right, we have, yeah, we have trash all over the blaze up. Right, right. Okay. Um , okay. What do we have that doesn't involve punching people into seats ? So Avengers end game finally conquered king of the world. James Cameron's Avatar to become the highest grossing film of all time. Oh, that's incredibly important. So the announcement was actually made last Saturday at comic, at the comic con uh , panel , um , where they were announcing Avengers and game is clicking past avatar. Um, and this week, so it was actually last weekend, so I'm sure by now it's even gone a little higher. So it took nine years for that record to be kept . Um, there's currently a gap of $500,000 or 500,000 in global ticket sales between Avatar and end game, but that was gonna obviously get capped , uh , later that day. And basically the, the marvel, you know, the head of Marvel said, thank you for making us, you know, the biggest movie of all time. But in reality it's not because they had to rerelease

Speaker 4:

the movie in order to get this to happen. Right . So they cheat it , but that's okay. I mean, it's petty. It's childish. Oh, and they have the rights of the avatar anyway, so it's their own movie. Now what did you what just because Disney annoys me. I know. And that's why we love doing this section on the podcast. Yeah, well it's that one h I get the scratch about bashing Disney . Right . I let you do it and then we'll get you to let me do it at the parks anymore. Well , no, because I don't want to get banned for life because God knows what happened . You'll get worst for me if I get you banned for life right now , I'll have to go and change my name and my identity just so that I can be [inaudible] wait is production to be able to get into the Disney parks. Right. All right , so that's it with Disney detective . Yes, it is. All right . Moving right along.

Speaker 6:

Uh ,

Speaker 4:

so some doctor who knew was what this was

Speaker 5:

probably a cute little thing that kind of popped up. So doctor whose robot dog canine is looking to be the hero of a spinoff series for children. Um, so for those of you who aren't familiar, canine was a, a little side character. Um, that came about. Uh, he actually first appeared in 1977 along with the fourth doctor. Um, Tom Baker , um , and

Speaker 4:

Tom Baker, my doctor . Uh , so

Speaker 5:

like there he's, he's set for a comeback in a new TV series , uh , aimed for children. Um, the series will see a redesigned canine who appears to be a little bit battled damaged and , um, who had been taking part in a space war. Um, so as

Speaker 4:

canines , a bad ass man.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. Um, so the source revealed that he's going to look a little bit more industrial and be covered in rivets. Um, he was actually already featured in several spinoffs, including canine and company in 1981 and he obviously came back , um, in the 2006 reboot of doctor who with David Tennant and actually also appeared in the share Sarah Jane Adventures in 2007. Um, so right now, two companies are actually bidding for the latest , uh , spinoff, which will be produced in the u k . Um, but unless it is actually picked up to be broadcast by the BBC, it's unlikely that there will actually be any doctor who references , uh , permitted for this standalone. So it's basically going to be a standalone unless BBC, you know, allows, and then they bring in.

Speaker 4:

Now is it going to be any age ? Is there any information on if it's going to be set in a specific timeframe during a specific doctor's reign ? Nope.

Speaker 5:

No , just , you know, basically he's going to be a little bit more damaged than previously seen. Um, and that there was some sort of space war that was really all in terms of the plot, you know, that, that they have right now. But that'll be cute.

Speaker 4:

Yeah , no man can , I was was cool . He was a great addition to , uh, Tom Baker's rain doctor . Yup .

Speaker 5:

So got to keep a lookout for that.

Speaker 4:

Uh , Orville News. What do we have on the Orville ?

Speaker 5:

So not to, you know, figure, keep this a little separate from, from the comic con and stuff. Cause this was actually one of the first things that that kind of came out was that , um, Seth Macfarlane actually announced last Saturday that the show was going to be moving from Fox to Hulu for its next season. And this is season three and this will be season three. Um, so according to , uh , some sources mcfarlane's current workload and the length of time it takes to finish work on the show , um , because of the special effects and everything would mean that the third season wouldn't have been ready for a mid season debut. Um, so now it looks like the new episodes we'll be launching on Hulu and it'll actually be towards the end of 2020. Um, so the, the streamer currently has the first two seasons available for anybody that subscribes. Um, so he was quoted as saying that the Orville has been a labor of love and that there are two companies which have supported that vision in such a way. So you have 20th century Fox television where I've had a deal with them from the start of my career. And then Fox broadcasting , um, which has been my broadcasting home for nearly 20 years. Um , my friends at the network understood that I was trying to do this with the series and they've done a spectacular job of marketing, launching programming for these past two seasons. But the show has just evolved and become more ambitious. Um, and I was determined, you know, that I wouldn't be able to deliver anything until 2020. Um, which would be a challenge for the network. So that's when they started discussing different options and it just looked like, hey, here, we can do it at Hulu and you know, you don't have to worry about it. And sure .

Speaker 4:

Has there been any speculation on how this move's going to affect the show? Cause I know, you know, we've had a number of other shows, the experience being one mothers , uh , uh , Lucifer wasn't very another where they moved from network television to streaming services and the, we've yet to see the effect of on the expanse. But we've, you know, we've heard them actually talk up .

Speaker 5:

Hmm . And that'll actually be something we'll talk about in, in , uh , the next, our next episode with the expanse. Um, but yeah, I think it's going to be something where it's probably gonna be a little grittier. I could definitely see them doing that. Obviously they don't have to worry about language. They could actually, you know, adult it up a little bit more. Um, changing the format or a longer format. They , they basically said, you know, now what we can do is, you know, if something's going to be an hour and a half long, some things an hour and a half long, if some thing's going to be 38 minutes, something's going to be 38 minutes. Now they can variable time. Right. And I've seen that on other streaming, you know, series where, you know, it's not always that 48 minute block. It's, you know, some episodes take a little bit longer, some can be done in a shorter period of time. Um, so I think that's, you know, in some cases it's an advantage for a lot of , uh, you know, series to , to come and do that. We saw the only one that we've , we've really seen so far transition . This was Lucifer. Lucifer had a very different feel, different show. It was good or bad in your opinion? I think it was good. I think it , it, you know, it, it , it gave it, I for me, because I had watched the show from the beginning and I think you could tell it wanted to be a little bit grittier, but it couldn't because of it being on streaming fry . Exactly. Um, you know, where like there were things that had happened that were, were emotional and hard hitting or, you know , uh, um, very dark, but it couldn't be dark. But yet when they kind of did a recap, you know, the first couple of episodes of what had happened in the past, you could see, you know, the pain and the anguish and you know, and, and um, you know, and obviously, and ash , I wasn't going to see that on national know and I , I didn't complain either. Um, but like some of the, the, the death scenes or the, you know, the, the one that , the person that got impaled, you know, you definitely wouldn't have seen that. You know, you got to see Lucifer more as his , um, demonic self then you did, you know, in , in the series television. Um, so I liked it. It, it added more grit to it. Um, so this might, you know, do the same, you know, for, for the Orville , I'm just sad that it's going to be like the end of 2020 now, you know, that's the one thing, the alternative is to get canceled on the jet . Oh absolutely. And , and that's, you know, and it's funny cause a friend of mine at work, we were talking, you know, cause there's so many different shows that you watch on Netflix and whatever. And it's like, you know, when it comes out, okay it's eight or 10 episodes and a weekend your , you've binged it. But even if you were to watch it, you know, within those, you know, four weeks or, or eight weeks or whatever, by the time the series comes back again, it's been almost a year and a half. It , it almost is kind of, it reminds me of , um, BBC television, you know, they, they are synonymous for doing, you know, they do a , uh , a series and then it's a year and a half before it comes back. And their seasons and their seasons are shorter form right there. We're right . Sherlock is like, right. It's like three. Right, exactly. Right. Exactly. So, and that's what I was, I was thinking, but then you're waiting two and a half years for something to happen and you definitely see that, you know, like we're fans of the crown and you know, it's been, it's been a while since the last season had ended and you know, they're still filming or finishing it up and it's like, oh , sometime it's slightly changed your , your k you can write , you changed your cast over. But that's the one thing, at least with network television is everybody Kinda got used to, oh, okay, September, October, the new season's going to start. Well , and the thing is, it's very formulaic. You have to satisfy your sponsors , your Oh, absolutely. Grind that you would get there. Right. And even he would, with today's scripted network television, it's very different now. That episode you write and you used to write and the tradition used to be, it started in September and went until May, it was usually 20 episodes. They took the summer off and then it started back again. Now you have shows that are only 10 episodes long. Then you have these mid season season finales . Then now you have shows that only premiere during the summer, like that's their, their time frame that they honestly that if anything, that's the one that I favor most because summer was terrible because summer is nothing but [inaudible] and that was summer was always good if you missed because then you could catch up or if there was too much to watch back before you could, you know, go on demand or stream or whatever because you can stream everything now. Right. So, so it'll, it'll be interesting to see, you know, how this goes for for them, but also is the trend going to happen where more network shows that, okay, well we weren't really doing all that well on network. Well maybe if we go streaming, you know, it's a very different business model because you're like , you're subscriber driven, you're not sponsored, driven. Right. And the problem with subscriber driven is you have generally a finite number of subscribers. So unless you're pulling in some kind of

Speaker 4:

show to draw more subscribers in, having air time does not guarantee more revenue. [inaudible] yeah . So that's kind of one of the catch 20 twos of a streaming service is that on network television, if my ratings are up, I can charge more for my episodes. Right . I don't have that as a source of revenue. Right. I can't bump, well , unless you're Disney, of course I can't keep bumping up the cost of a subscription because the ratings go up. Right. You see Netflix do it and there's major outcries when Netflix does it and Netflix justifies it by spending four and a half billion dollars on content

Speaker 5:

and , and, and you can tell, right . You know, it's not, oh, we're getting the same thing.

Speaker 4:

The luxury of saying, okay, right , we're going to pull in the , we'll just say the experience for instance. So there's a fixed cost that they have to pay for that. Yeah. Just to get the episodes , not even to produce anything. Right. So we're going to pay for that, but I can't charge people enough money to offset that cost on their subscriptions. Right. And I can't throw advertisements out there. Now, granted there are different scale of subscriptions for Hulu where you do have advertisements on there. So it's kind of a hybrid form of , of streaming. So we'll see. I hopefully it should, it should pick up, we should get a little bit more , uh, grit as we say out of it. And it shouldn't , it should still be good even after the week .

Speaker 5:

Right. So on, you know, the tales of, of Orval , um , two months ago, the two, two of the stars actually had gotten married , uh, Adrian , uh , palliate and Scott Grimes. Well now it seems that they filed for divorce after two months of marriage. Um, so it was actually reported , uh, on Monday , um, where they had actually just appeared at San Diego Comic Con and sat, you know, through a panel. Um, and uh, she actually was the one that filed for divorce. So the two started dating in 2017 but didn't actually make their relationship public until the following year. Um, they actually, like I said, had just , uh, tied the night in May , um, in Austin, Texas. Um, they are two of the leads in the show playing commander Kelly Grayson and Lieutenant Gordon Malloy. Uh , this will actually be her first divorce and Scott's third.

Speaker 4:

Well , third time's a charm, right? Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, my philosophy, I think everyone should be married and promptly divorced once in their life, just as a life lesson. Right, right. It wasn't an overall , it was a profound life lesson for me. A , I think you would probably agree having gone through it once and then you just, you move on and do it right.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. Yeah. So it's a shame, you know, cause they had been together for, you know, two years and only married for two. At that point. It's like, well why'd you even, Yep . Married. Well, at that point most judges alight will know the marriage or you don't have to worry about know true assets and stuff like that. There's no , so the other thing is, it'll be interesting to see now with the show how, what different swells it might actually contribute to that grittiness. It could. And also you figure if they're , you know, if it's not going to be airing until, you know, the end of next year, you know, maybe by then you might have a cash gene , they might have a cash changer . Maybe they'll be back together. You never know. You never know. So that is it for our entertainment news. My dear. Awesome. Let's move on to our insightful picks of the week.

Speaker 6:

Uh,

Speaker 5:

I turn it over to you, my dear. So I was actually at a loss of what to talk about because I think I've , I've gone through everything that I watch. Um, but while we were talking , um, and you were mentioning what your insightful pick was that kind of triggered something , um, to , to, to bring exactly. Um, so , um, excuse me. So this past February, there was a , um, a short subject documentary , uh, that had aired on Netflix and it actually won an academy award. Um, excuse me the year before. Um, and it is called period, end of sentence. Um, and it's us , uh , documentary , uh, IX documentary you're doing, I know I did a documentary. I know. And it's only 26 minutes long, Eh ? No . Um, so the , uh, um, wow, totally mind blank. There. Totally did. Um, so it's about Indian women and the stigma that surrounds menstruation and being able to manufacture sanitary pads. Um, when we were, you know, talking about the topic last night, it's just mind blowing that in this day and age around the world, that something so basic isn't available for all women. Right. Sorry about that. Um, and that there's the stigma and it's a taboo, tough topic to even mention. And so this filmmaker , um, so, so the backstory is that in 2012, a teacher heard that there were difficulties , uh, facing around the globe about being able to get product, you know, to, and so she kinda started the, this plan and found a person in India who, this gentleman who's actually known as the pad man who was able to, to make pads inexpensively because women can buy them over there, but they're just so expensive. And as you see in the , uh, the documentary, you'll have, you know, like a , a little convenience store and they're back behind the counter or something. So it's not like a woman can just go and pick them up and pay for them. Like the woman actually has to ask to , to get them in . They're very expensive and because women have just been so shamed about it, they can't even say the word menstruation or period. They say it and that, and you know, it, it's, it's such a dirty word. It was here in the fifties. Absolutely. You know, and not so much, I don't know if we ever kind of went through that same thing, but there , um, because of the religious aspect, when a woman has her, her period, she's considered unclean. So in some cases she's not allowed to go to the temple. She's not allowed to go pray . She's not allowed to cook. She's not allowed, you know, kind of ironic considering that your body's process of cleaning itself. Right. Exactly. If anything, you're more clean than, than anywhere in time. Um, and that, and we've, you know, seen it and heard it time and time again, is that girls aren't allowed to go to school. So you have these girls that are missing, you know, four or five days of school a month and are constantly being, you know, left back just because they have their period. It's, it's nothing. Um, so th you know, so this group went in and they, you know, showed these women how to, to make these pads at, you know, a fraction of the cost. Um , and they started their own little factory and they were almost like, I'm traveling sales women. They, you know, would take their packaging and they would go around to different villages and meet with the different women and say, you know, would you buy these and would you use these? And you know, and women other, you know, talking to other women, you know, they were able to kind of break breakthrough . It's still has such a far way to go, but it's, it's very eyeopening for someone who, I just go to Walmart and buy them. I don't even think about it, you know? And it's kind of funny because being as old as I am, I still kind of like twins, like, Oh God, buy these. Or when I go to checkout, if I don't go through the self checkout, oh, is there a guy, a girl? And then there are times I'm like, screw it. You know what, I'm bleeding, whatever. You know, there should be no shame, you know, and we shouldn't even,

Speaker 4:

so it sounds like not only are they addressing a real need here to get these products out there to those who need it, but it's also creating jobs in the process.

Speaker 5:

Absolutely. Because all of these women who normally didn't have, you know, any, any real work, they basically would stay home and take care of their family. They're now helping to make a living because, you know, 90% of the people that are working, you know, for, for this company are, are women. So it , it , it's helping all around. So yeah, it's again, it's a 26 minute long documentary. Um, I've, you know, we kind of have talked about it before and to have Madison sit down and, and watch it just so that she can see exactly, you know, mommy goes to the store and buys them in their , you know, sitting in the bathroom for you and you know, you still go to school and yeah, you might not feel well and you might not want to, but you know, things aren't taken away from you because of it losing opportunities . Right, exactly. So, yeah, definitely. Um, you know, 26 minutes long period, end of sentence , uh, can be found on Netflix. Awesome. Great. Thank you.

Speaker 6:

Uh,

Speaker 4:

so mine this week , uh , is contributing to the show's title this week , uh , of the space flight portion because I make up the titles and I can do that. Um , you're allowed . So this one is , uh, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Moon landing. Um , I'm sure everyone's noticed. You've been inundated with various documents. Very cool. Um, there's been a ton of stuff to watch. This one stood out to me. This was the one that is called when we were Apollo was directed by a Zachary wheel . This actually started out as a Kickstarter project, so it has been crowdfunded and I'll just read the, the , the byline. The intro line for this Apollo was a story. Apollo story is a metaphor for our ability to rise to challenges and exceed with bold solutions behind every astronaut who set foot on the moon was Apollo's workforce a team of over 400,000. Who knew that the program was only as good as their effort. This film offers an intimate look at experiences of its inspiring backstage figures who spent almost a decade getting us to the moon and back. Who were the men and women of Project Apollo? Who are they today? What do they think of the extraordinary effort they helped make possible? Go Inciting with the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing in 2019. Uh , we were when we were, Apollo is an intimate and personal look at the Apollo space program through the lives and experiences of some of its most inspiring behind the scenes figures, engineers, technicians, builders and contractors who spent the better part of a decade working to get us to the moon and back. Now, the one thing that I loved about this is it was not glorifying the astronauts and not to take anything away from the heroes, did actually strap themselves to these multi ton bombs, basically flew them into space. Um, but in order to do that, you had to have an entire army of people, primarily contractors. And that was the thing that hit home with this documentary was the went back and the interviewed people, engineers, mathematicians, computer programmers, construction workers, rocket scientists. Uh, I mean they went down to the point of interviewing the guys that were laying the concrete for the launch pads . Um, it was a fantastic documentary, incredibly well researched and it was about the people and their experiences. They didn't just talk about what they did on the project. They talked about the inspiration, the project brought to them. You know, it started off in the 50s after Sputnik launched, you know, there was effort that was put forward in the missile program before NASA was even created. And some of these people started, you know, working at redstone and some of the army in and DV arsenals are force arsenals , um, to build these rockets. And it was then eventually wrapped into NASA. Um, but the, the efforts, the , you know, to get 400,000 people working towards a common goals and amazing thing. Um , and the one story that struck home to me that I mentioned to you that inspired your pick was this one woman who was a stay at home mom at the time. She was so inspired by Kennedy speech telling us that we need to go to the moon. She decided that she wanted to be a part of the space program and she had mentioned this intention to her husband and her husband's comment to her at the time, you know, the fifties mentality at the time here says, well, you won't make enough money to buy your own Kotex. And she says, shortly after that I was divorced. I was a single mother trying to raise my three kids and you know, had very little financial aid coming in and I had to do something. She eventually wound up working for IBM as a computer programmer and she was one of the people who contributed the contributed to the guidance software that was on the lunar lander when it landed. Wow. That's incredible. That I'm really , it was like stories like that. They were so personal. Um, and they were so inspiring. You know, the , the one was happened to be a, a rocket engineer who was recruited out of high school after he built a model of a rocket engine for a science project. The first science science fair that his school did. Wow . And , uh, the army came and recruited him to work on the redstone project and he eventually was wrapped up into NASA and was part of building the Saturn five rocket. Oh Wow . Um, so that, just, that level of detail on this documentary was just, it was, it was, it was inspiring to watch it and to see these real people, you know, they're not test pilots, they're not, they didn't go into space. Um, but just the level of pride that they took in the things that, that did what they did, we wouldn't have been able to put men up in the mood , you know ? Absolutely. Um, so it , it really hit home the contributions of all these people that got us to where we are and you know, and I, again, I hate getting political on things like this, but you hear the phrase, make America great again. That's when America was great when you had men and women who weren't traditionally working together, who came together, you had African Americans that came together, you had minorities from all around the world. You had, you had Australians that were contributing to this. You had situations where you had to put tracking stations around the world and you had to get all the cooperation of all these nations, all these people. That's what America was about. America was about, about bringing the world together, not dividing it. Cause in order to come in order to do the impossible, which is exactly what they did with this Apollo program, you had to have the entire world on board with it. It was just a very inspiring thing. And the documentary was just incredible and it really was very good tech. So that was my pick a when we were, Apollo is available for streaming on Amazon prime today. Um, I think that's all we had that we have. Uh , we had no after thoughts cause we're going to be doing a special podcast on comic con . Um , so we'll be back shortly for that. Uh , I think we need to get some lunch though, where we're running a little late today. Uh, that's it. Anything else? Nope. All right . Thanks for watching. We'll be back shortly with another podcast and one next week as well. Yup . Thanks a lot. Bye .

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] .

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